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Category Archives: Self Employed Taxes

I am 78 yrs old, I have a ROTH IRA and plan to cash it out, will this be considered an income?

Q) I am 78 yrs old, I have a ROTH IRA and plan to cash it out, will this be considered an income, subject to tax. Will it increase my gross income and bump me to the next taxable bracket?

A) Please discuss this with your tax accountant. In general you can withdraw contributions you made to your Roth IRA anytime, tax- and penalty-free. However, you may have to pay taxes and penalties on earnings in your Roth IRA. Withdrawals from a Roth IRA you’ve had less than five years.

Age 59 and under.
You can withdraw contributions you made to your Roth IRA anytime, tax- and penalty-free. However, you may have to pay taxes and penalties on earnings in your Roth IRA.

Withdrawals from a Roth IRA you’ve had less than five years.

If you take a distribution of Roth IRA earnings before you reach age 59½ and before the account is five years old, the earnings may be subject to taxes and penalties. You may be able to avoid penalties (but not taxes) in the following situations:

You use the withdrawal (up to a $10,000 lifetime maximum) to pay for a first-time home purchase.
You use the withdrawal to pay for qualified education expenses.
You’re at least age 59½.
You become disabled or pass away.
You use the withdrawal to pay for unreimbursed medical expenses or health insurance if you’re unemployed.
The distribution is made in substantially equal periodic payments.1
Withdrawals from a Roth IRA you’ve had more than five years.

If you’re under age 59½ and your Roth IRA has been open five years or more,1 your earnings will not be subject to taxes if you meet one of the following conditions:

You use the withdrawal (up to a $10,000 lifetime maximum) to pay for a first-time home purchase.
You’re at least age 59½.
You become disabled or pass away.
You use the withdrawal to pay for unreimbursed medical expenses or health insurance if you’re unemployed.
The distribution is made in substantially equal periodic payments.1

Age 59½ to 70.
Withdrawals from a Roth IRA you’ve had less than five years.

If you haven’t met the five-year holding requirement, your earnings will be subject to taxes but not penalties.

Withdrawals from a Roth IRA you’ve had more than five years.

If you’ve met the five-year holding requirement, you can withdraw money from a Roth IRA with no taxes or penalties.

Age 70½ and over.
Withdrawals from a Roth IRA you’ve had less than five years.

If you haven’t met the five-year holding requirement, your earnings will be subject to taxes but not penalties.

Withdrawals from a Roth IRA you’ve had more than five years.

If you’ve met the five-year holding requirement, you can withdraw money from a Roth IRA with no taxes or penalties. Source: https://www.schwab.com/public/schwab/investing/retirement_and_planning/understanding_iras/roth_ira/withdrawal_rules

Do we take the standard deduction for our house interest payments or do we take 20% of the actual tax amount paid

Q) We live in Grand junction Colorado and bought a house here. We have a mcc a mortgage credit certificate that says we can deduct 20% from our interest paid on our first mortgage. The interest paid is less than the standard deduction. Do we take the standard deduction or do we take 20% of theContinue Reading

145 Responses to Click to Tell Us Your Experience At Your Local Tax Office

  1. According to the IRS website you can review your current tax repayment plan:

    Reviewing a Payment Plan
    You can view details of your current payment plan (type of agreement, due dates, and amount you need to pay) by logging into the Online Payment Agreement tool using the Apply/Revise button below.

    What You Can Change Using the Online Payment Agreement Tool
    If your existing payment plan is not paid through a Direct Debit, you can use the Online Payment Agreement tool to make the following changes:

    Change your monthly payment amount
    Change your monthly payment due date
    Convert an existing agreement to a Direct Debit agreement
    Reinstate after default
    You can log into the Online Payment Agreement tool using the Apply/Revise button below.

    If your payment plan is paid through Direct Debit, you must contact us to make a change.

    How To Revise an Online Payment Plan
    Log in to the Online Payment Agreement tool using the Apply/Revise button below. On the first page, you can revise your current plan type, payment date, and amount. Then submit your changes.

    If your new monthly payment amount does not meet the requirements, you will be prompted to revise the payment amount. If you are unable to make the minimum required payment amount, you will receive directions for completing a Form 433-F Collection Information Statement (PDF) and how to submit it.

    If your plan has lapsed through default and is being reinstated, you may incur a reinstatement fee.
    https://www.irs.gov/payments/online-payment-agreement-application

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Do we take the standard deduction for our house interest payments or do we take 20% of the actual tax amount paid

Q) We live in Grand junction Colorado and bought a house here. We have a mcc a mortgage credit certificate that says we can deduct 20% from our interest paid on our first mortgage. The interest paid is less than the standard deduction. Do we take the standard deduction or do we take 20% of theContinue Reading

How much does an student have to make before filing income tax return?

Q) How much does an student have to make before filing income tax return? A) According to the IRS: If you are an unmarried dependent student, you must file a tax return if your earned and/or unearned income exceeds certain limits. To find these limits refer to Dependents under Who Must File, in Publication 501, Exemptions, Standard Deduction and Filing Information.Continue Reading

How would I obtain a private letter ruling?

Q) How would I obtain a private letter ruling? A) According to the IRS: The procedures and user fees for obtaining a letter ruling are published annually in the first revenue procedure of each calendar year. The current procedures are in Revenue Procedure 2014-1 which can be found in Internal Revenue Bulletin 2014-1. The Revenue Procedure and the Internal RevenueContinue Reading

Filed Under: IRS

What is a split refund?

Q) What is a split refund? A) The IRS allows your refund to be split. A split refund lets you divide your refund, in any proportion you want, and direct deposit the funds into up to three different accounts with U.S. financial institutions. To allocate a split refund. you should use Form 8888 (PDF), Allocation of Refund, to request to haveContinue Reading

Filed Under: IRS

Will I see a date for my Tax refund right away?

Q) Will I see a date for my Tax refund right away? A) According to the IRS: Where’s My Refund? will not give you a refund date right away. We must first receive your tax return and then we have to process it and approve your refund. Where’s My Refund? will give you a personalized date once your refund isContinue Reading

Self-employment tax

Self-employment tax is a tax consisting of Social Security and Medicare taxes primarily for individuals who work for themselves. It is similar to the Social Security and Medicare taxes withheld from the pay of most wage earners. You figure self-employment tax (SE tax) yourself using Schedule SE (Form 1040). Social Security and Medicare taxes ofContinue Reading

Who is Self-Employed?

Generally, you are self-employed if any of the following apply to you. You carry on a trade or business as a sole proprietor or an independent contractor. You are a member of a partnership that carries on a trade or business. You are otherwise in business for yourself (including a part-time business)

All employers must file a Form W-2

Every employer engaged in a trade or business who pays remuneration, including noncash payments of $600 or more for the year (all amounts if any income, social security, or Medicare tax was withheld) for services performed by an employee must file a Form W-2 for each employee (even if the employee is related to theContinue Reading

How much does an student have to make before filing income tax return?

Q) How much does an student have to make before filing income tax return? A) According to the IRS: If you are an unmarried dependent student, you must file a tax return if your earned and/or unearned income exceeds certain limits. To find these limits refer to Dependents under Who Must File, in Publication 501, Exemptions, Standard Deduction and Filing Information.Continue Reading

I lost my refund check. How do I get a new one?

Q) I lost my refund check. How do I get a new one? A) According to the IRS: If you have lost your refund check, there are several options available to initiate a refund trace on your behalf. You can use the “Where’s My Refund?” system available through the IRS website. You can call the IRS toll-free number atContinue Reading

Filed Under: IRS

My husband won 14,000.00 at casino..Can he claim all the losing lotto tickets … to wash out taxes?

Q) My husband won 14,000.00 at casino in Delaware we live in Md. Can he claim all the losing lotto tickets he has lost this year to wash out taxes owed for this 14,000.00 winning. Also what is the tax percentage to Maryland and Federal for tax withholding on this amount. A) According o TurboTax.comContinue Reading

How do I know if I have to file quarterly individual estimated tax payments?

Q) How do I know if I have to file quarterly individual estimated tax payments? A) According to the IRS: You must make estimated tax payments for the current tax year if both of the following apply: You expect to owe at least $1,000 in tax for the current tax year, after subtracting your withholding and refundable credits. YouContinue Reading