Find your local Federal and State Tax Office here! Not a government website.

Welcome to TaxOffices.org

TaxOffices.org is a private website not a government website. We provide a free service providing general internet researched tax information and location of your nearest IRS and State tax offices. We are not tax accountants. Your local Tax office will help you if you need to resolve you tax issues, have questions about how the tax law applies to your individual or company tax return, or need to speak with someone face-to-face on your taxes. If you have questions on your taxes it is always best to consult with a certified tax accountant in your state. The Tax Relief Helpline is NOT A State Government or IRS service and is not affiliated with taxoffices.org.




PLEASE NOTE: ALL WALK-IN IRS OFFICES ARE BY APPOINTMENT ONLY UNLESS YOU ARE MAKING A PAYMENT (CHECK OR MONEY ORDER) OR SUBMITTING A CURRENT YEAR RETURN. CASH PAYMENTS NEED AND APPOINTMENT. FOR APPOINTMENTS PLEASE CALL 1-844-545-5640.

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Self Employment Tax

According to the IRS, before you can determine if you are subject to self-employment tax and income tax, you must figure your net profit or net loss from your business. You do this by subtracting your business expenses from your business income. If your expenses are more than your income, the difference is a net loss. If your expenses are less than your income, the difference is net profit and becomes part of your income. Self-employed individuals generally must pay self-employment tax (SE tax) as well as income tax. In some situations your loss may be limited. As a self-employed individual, generally you are required to file an annual return and pay estimated tax quarterly. SE tax is a Social Security and Medicare tax primarily for individuals who work for themselves. It is similar to the Social Security and Medicare taxes withheld from the pay of most wage earners.

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DISCLAIMER: This site is NOT affiliated with any government sites or agencies, this site is for informational purposes only. If you have questions or issues about your taxes it’s always best you contact your Local State Tax or IRS Office. Your questions asked will be researched in order to find the best possible response. We are not tax accountants. It’s always best to consult with the IRS or an experienced licensed tax accountant or tax attorney.




147 Responses to Click to Tell Us Your Experience At Your Local Tax Office

  1. According to the IRS – Some tax returns take longer to process than others for many reasons, including when a return:

    Includes errors
    Is incomplete
    Is affected by identity theft or fraud
    Includes a claim filed for an Earned Income Tax Credit or an Additional Child Tax Credit. See Q&A below.
    Includes a Form 8379, Injured Spouse Allocation, which could take up to 14 weeks to process
    Needs further review in general
    We will contact you by mail when we need more information to process your return. https://www.irs.gov/refunds/tax-season-refund-frequently-asked-questions

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How do I know if I have to file quarterly individual estimated tax payments?

Q) How do I know if I have to file quarterly individual estimated tax payments? A) According to the IRS: You must make estimated tax payments for the current tax year if both of the following apply: You expect to owe at least $1,000 in tax for the current tax year, after subtracting your withholding and refundable credits. YouContinue Reading

Who is Self-Employed?

Generally, you are self-employed if any of the following apply to you. You carry on a trade or business as a sole proprietor or an independent contractor. You are a member of a partnership that carries on a trade or business. You are otherwise in business for yourself (including a part-time business)

How much does an student have to make before filing income tax return?

Q) How much does an student have to make before filing income tax return? A) According to the IRS: If you are an unmarried dependent student, you must file a tax return if your earned and/or unearned income exceeds certain limits. To find these limits refer to Dependents under Who Must File, in Publication 501, Exemptions, Standard Deduction and Filing Information.Continue Reading

Why is my refund different than the amount expected on tax return I filed?

Q) Why is my refund different than the amount expected on tax return I filed? A) According to the IRS – If you owe past-due federal tax, state income tax, state unemployment compensation debts, child support, spousal support, or certain federal nontax debts, such as student loans, all or part of your refund may be used (offset)Continue Reading

I lost my refund check. How do I get a new one?

Q) I lost my refund check. How do I get a new one? A) According to the IRS: If you have lost your refund check, there are several options available to initiate a refund trace on your behalf. You can use the “Where’s My Refund?” system available through the IRS website. You can call the IRS toll-free number atContinue Reading

Filed Under: IRS

Do I have to pay taxes on my social security benefits?

Q) Do I have to pay taxes on my social security benefits? A) According to the IRS: Social security benefits include monthly retirement, survivor, and disability benefits. They do not include supplemental security income (SSI) payments, which are not taxable. The amount of social security benefits that must be included on your income tax return and usedContinue Reading

Filed Under: IRS

Limited Liability Company (LLC)

A Limited Liability Company (LLC) is a business structure allowed by state statute. Each state may use different regulations, and you should check with your state if you are interested in starting a Limited Liability Company. Owners of an LLC are called members. Most states do not restrict ownership, and so members may include individuals,Continue Reading

How can I get a ITIN ?

Q) How can I get a ITIN ? A) According to the IRS – If you do not have a SSN and are not eligible to obtain a SSN, but you have a requirement to furnish a federal tax identification number or file a federal income tax return, you must apply for an ITIN. If you haveContinue Reading

Filed Under: IRS

Business Structures

When beginning a business, you must decide what form of business entity to establish. Your form of business determines which income tax return form you have to file. The most common forms of business are the sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation, and S corporation. A Limited Liability Company (LLC) is a relatively new business structure allowedContinue Reading

What happens if I file my IRS taxes late?

According to the IRS – April 15 is the annual deadline for most people to file their federal income tax return and pay any taxes they owe. By law, the IRS may assess penalties to taxpayers for both failing to file a tax return and for failing to pay taxes they owe by the deadline.Continue Reading

Filed Under: IRS

I claim my daughter as a dependent, she is in college can she claim her own personal exemption.

Q) I claim my daughter as a dependent, she is in college can she claim her own personal exemption. A) According the IRS; If you can claim an exemption for your daughter as a dependent on your income tax return, she cannot claim her own personal exemption on her income tax return. If an individual is filingContinue Reading

Sole Proprietorships

A sole proprietor is someone who owns an unincorporated business by himself or herself. However, if you are the sole member of a domestic limited liability company (LLC), you are not a sole proprietor if you elect to treat the LLC as a corporation.